Pakikipagkapwa: we are all connected at our Source. This sacred interconnectedness flows through all of Life. The Illusion is that we are all separate and apart from one another.

compassion comes from the inner realization of pakikipagkapwa

ahimsa is the sanskrit term for non violence. it is also a sacred practice. non-violence means in action or in thought. a life that hurts no-one. when one feels a connection to All, ahimsa comes naturally to one. ahimsa to me is compassion. so pakikipagkapwa and ahimsa are deeply related and interwoven.

how does one gauge pakikpagkapwa? contemplate on this: do you feel connected or do you feel separated? And there lies your answer. when you look at people and the world, do you feel connected... or do your ego thoughts separate your from Others, the World and the Source?

Now, how do we all come to realize this in this world... that we people are ALL related... ALL part of the same Universal Family... all responsible for each other... each for the fate of the other. For this realization can heal the world.

Can you perceive that you are connected by invisible threads of relationship to everything else in Creation?


kapwa. kin. fellow. an element of Filipino philosophy.

The tagalog ka indicates common bond. Kababayan, for example, are town mates (ka + bayan, or town) and kamag-anak (ka + mag-anak, or family)


Mitakuye Oyasin - A Lakota Indian Prayer And The Spirit Of Relatedness---I met Bernie at Hygeia Wellness Center in CT. He is an artist, a craftsman and a healer. He taught me those words. These two words mean All My Relations or We are All Related. To say this prayer is to speak to God on behalf of everyone and everything on Earth. Mitakuye Oyasin honors the sacredness of each person's individual spiritual path, acknowledges the sacredness of all life (human, animal, plant, etc.) and creates an energy of awareness which strengthens not only the person who prays but the entire planet.

We are all Family. And all means all, -- people, animals and all of nature. What is done in one part of the world affects the entire globe, and all those living on it.


We are all linked by a fabric of unseen connections. This fabric is constantly changing and evolving. This field is directly structured and influenced by our behavior and by our understanding. --- David Bohm, quantum physicist 1917-1992


There are no others. --- Ramana Maharshi


It's so clear that you have to cherish everyone, every flower is to bloom. --- Alice Walker


Date: Wed, 17 May 2004 10:57:17 -0700 pagbabalikloob discussion group

"Our deepest inner Selves, that which is closest to the Source, are indeed connected to each other. Our highest values and aspirations are the same even if we go about our lives in different ways and our political, religious, economic stands are different... remember kapwa above and through our differences. Kapwa is what will connect us despite differences amongst us... when I was younger, kapwa was translated directly into english as "other." I had issues with that because the word "other" seemed more indicative of separation, a Western influence. it took my own decoloinization, shedding of elitism, and journey to unedrstnad kapwa as being about connection and compassion for the "other"... kapwa tao comes closer to articulating with two words what compassion is about, and "pakikipagkapwa" is an articulation of "the interconnections that many "others" have with each other"... That your kapwa or your fellow is not separated from you?--- Perla


Wed, 19 May 2004 07:54:13 EDT pagbabalikloob discussion group

The Tagalog usage of the word "kapwa" (the word is also found in other Pinoy languages) suggests the positive qualites of fellowship, sharing, mutuality, unity, sameness. This is evident in such variations as "kapwa-tao, pakikipagkapwa-tao, kapwa-Pinoy, kapwa-lalaki, kapwa-bata, etc." The word is a close relative "sama" and "pakikisama." --- DonLuisC


Date: Tue Sep 11, 2007 5:31 pm (PDT) pagbabalikloob discussion group

>the best book I found on this concept,
> other than my practical,
> daily, community field experiences and
> interactions, is Kapwa, by Karin de
> Guia, wife of Kidlat Tahimik. She was in the
> same journey as you
> are,questioning, inquiring, so she immersed
> herself in the culture, and
> then, she understood how it works and captured
> her insights in this book.--- Prosy


Date: Tue, 11 Sep 2007 10:03:11 -0700 (PDT) pagbabalikloob discussion group

...the movement from pakikisama to pakikikapwa-tao implies some kind of structured movement from outer to inner.--- BJB


Date: Wed, 19 May 2004 09:26:24 -0700 pagbabalikloob discussion group

Acc to Ver Enriquez, pakikisama is the more superficial version of pakikipagkapwa. The former is what we call "smooth interpersonal relations" while pakikipagkapwa refers to empathy/identification with the other. One can practice pakikisama without necesssarily feeling deep empathy.--- Leny


A fundamental Filipino cultural concept is kapwa, the unity of "self " and "others," a sense of "fellow being," a recognition of shared identity or inner self shared with others. "Anyone looking for a core concept that would help explain Filipino interpersonal behavior cannot help but be struck by the super ordinate concept of kapwa... wrote Filipino psychologist Virgilio Enriquez.


Date: Sun Feb 12, 2006 10:08 AM babaylan discussion group

also, the tagalog ka-loob means your kapwa (the other who is like you) has the
same (capacity for) interiority. and on a deeper level, Ka-loob means you are
one with God (which is why here, I am using capital K :-)). we sometimes say
"pinagkaloob ng (Diyos/God or a person)......." which means "one is
given/entrusted/ imparted with something vital from the giver's loob" (even if
it's an object). mga kapwa ko tagalog, am i right in this? (i am tagalog by
birth, but have more exposure to visayan/cebuano words)...---agnes


Date: Thu Jan 12, 2006 3:18 PM pagbabalikloob discussion group

MFernan318: This is an excerpt from the column of Ellen
Tordesillas of Malaya newspaper:

...The Filipino is into weaving, a metaphor. We are
social weavers. We place a lot of premium on
pakikisama and pakikipagkapwa. We weave theirs into
ours that we all become part of them...


Date: Fri Feb 10, 2006 10:33 AM pagbabalikloob discussion group

In my personal life i came to this: You can't
fight feelings of inferiority(whether from
stereotypes, colonial mentality or low
self-esteem) with feelings of superiority.
Because inferiority and superiority come from
the same place. And actually colonizer's
mentality and colonized mentality come from the
same place too. They all come from the illusion
of heirarchy... of the belief that racial,
political, military, educational, cultural,
religious aspects of human life make one person,
one community, one nation more privileged or
better than or over another. The need for
heirarchy comes from the instinct of survival---
this underlying thought that "if anyone is going
to deserve to survive its going to be ME because
I'm going to be better than Others!"

Stereotypes are part of the illusion that people
are Others, and can be seen from the outside.
Stereotypes are PERCEPTIONS that are separate
from our selves. One's mind can dwell along
inside OR outside of the limitations of other
people. And that's what filipina stereotypes
are---the limitations of the minds of other
people.

The person who formulate this phrase was totally
right on: We are spiritual beings having a human
experience. Pagbabalikloob is realization of the
meaning of this phrase. Pagbabalikloob is truly a
process of mastering the skill of seeing through
worldly Illusions of human experience.
Pagbabalikloob is the realization that your
Loob(deepest, real self) is a Divine spark that
dwells within you. That you are more than the
thoughts and feelings that come from living in
the world.

Pagbabalikloob and pakikipagkapwa are
intertwined. Deeper understanding and feelings of
pakikipagkapwa manifest as one comes home to
their Loob. Pakikipagkapwa is the realization
that the another is not The Other. Pakikipagkapwa
is more than just seeing someone else as your
fellow, chum or buddy (like pakikisama)... it is
realization that others are the same as you....
that "you and I are both trying to figure things
out this game called life and as I do I'll share
with you what i found out... and you don't have
to be the same color... race... have the same....
last name... religion... alma mater...
province...accent.... whatever...as me..."

"Namaste" and "mabuhay" phrase capture the
essence of pakikipagkapwa. And this came up in
the babaylan discussion group. Namaste (roughly
translated "The Light that dwells in me is the
also the Light that dwells within you.") Linda
Nietes pointed out that saying "Namaste" is the
same as saying "Mabuhay." Look at the meaning of
mabuhay and Linda's right. "Buhay" can mean more
than just life span or lifestyle. Buhay s also
life energy, life force. "Ma-buhay" is to live
with fullness. to say mabuhay to another is to
wish them a fullness of life.

I was delighted Linda pointed this out. Our
Filipino ancestors understood this ancient wisdom
even as the ancients of India did. Our heritage
contains deep wisdom. The Filipino who says this
with full awareness acknowledges the Life force
in the greeted person and sincerely wishes that
person a fuller Life.

We can fight fears, stereotypes and limitations
with a fully aware way of greeting "Mabuhay" upon
others. Say to those with such
limitations----"Mabuhay" and in this way you are
saying "May your limitations fall away so you can
live life to the fullest. May you, like me, live
Life to fullfillment and realization.

Mabuhay to you all---Perla


Date: Sun Feb 12, 2006 10:08 AM babaylan discussion group

...wouldn't it be lovely if mabuhay, both as a greeting and as a lived experience,
flows between kapwa filipinos? as it is now, my sense is that it isn't flowing
as it should-- it is exclaimed, yes, as a welcome and closing greeting in
conferences and letters (and during PAL flights :-)), and i'm sure the greeting
carries a chock-full of spirit in many exchanges, but a greeting like this
really flows if it is lived... like aloha, perhaps.---Agnes


Date: Mon Feb 13, 2006 6:57 PM babaylan discussion group

...I really appreciate this alignment of mabuhay with aloha. I lived in Honolulu for a year and near the end of my stay, I was beginning to perceive the different layers of Aloha and Kamaina. Kamaina is like kapwa, isn't it? That sense of the familiar spirit, shared experience, triumph over tragedy, as well as a sense of connectedness with the land and it's many peoples (whether human or plant or stone). Kamaina is about 'being local.'...It's healing, then, to bring Mabuhay back into my consciousness as a positive, and dare I say, astig word - a fierce word, to soak in the wisdom presented here and recapture this lost word.---Bec


Date: Mon May 19, 2004 6:57 PM pagbabalikloob discussion group

...The Tagalog usage of the word "kapwa" (the word is also found
in other Pinoy languages) suggests the positive qualites of
fellowship, sharing, mutuality, unity, sameness. This is evident in such
variations as "kapwa-tao, pakikipagkapwa-tao, kapwa-Pinoy,
kapwa-lalaki, kapwa-bata, etc." The word is a close relative
"sama" and "pakikisama."
---DonLuisC


Once individuals link together they become something different... Only when we join with others do our gifts become visible, even to ourselves. --- Margaret Wheatley and Myron Kellner-Rogers


Although people appear to be black, white or brown; gay, straight, or bi; male or female; able or disabled — these are resonances that reflect a universe that appreciates andd solicits difference. Sexuality, gender, class, and racce are not deterministic categories; rather, they are fugues and etudes in a larger and more complex symphony. --- Barbara A. Holmes


Spiritual Politics

Transforming politics - a new paradigm

...politics is really the art of governance, a science that synthesizes opposing views into a higher level of understanding. Politics is usually the last frontier in the process of cultural transformation. The concepts of "spiritual politics," "transformational politics," and "green politics" are gradually making their way into the mainstream.

These emerging paradigms promotes a more wholistic approach to the art of governance, which then promote a symbiosis between personal and social change.The new paradigms recognize the sacred interconnection of all life. New paradigms in politics, like the new paradigms in medicine, recognize the link between body, mind and spirit. In fact, many of the new ways of thinking about personal health apply to the health of society and the planet, as well. Transformational politics recognizes that changing the world comes from the inside out, and that personal health and planetary health are intimately connected. The process of healing the self and healing the planet is profoundly linked.

This new political paradigm is being developed by a wide range of people, including well-known political figures such as the Dalai Lama, Tom Hayden, Jerry Brown, and writers Corinne McLaughlin and Gordon Davidson, authors of the book "Spiritual Politics - Changing the World from the Inside Out." A key principle of the new spiritual, transformational paradigm is that "the personal is political and the political is personal." This involves a philosophy of moral accountability, where private lives must be lived in accordance with publicly stated principles. It begins with the simple, but difficult, recognition that if we want to transform the world into a kinder, more harmonious place, we must transform ourselves.

...A key principle of the new spiritual, transformational paradigm is that "the personal is political and the political is personal." This involves a philosophy of moral accountability, where private lives must be lived in accordance with publicly stated principles. It begins with the simple, but difficult, recognition that if we want to transform the world into a kinder, more harmonious place, we must transform ourselves.

Here are some of the key principles on which this new political paradigm is based:

· Respecting the interconnection of all life
· Creating a synthesis out of adversarial positions
· Transcending old definitions of "left" and "right"
· Matching rights with responsibilities
· Promoting government initiatives to develop self-reliance
· Searching for common ground for the good of the whole
· Thinking in whole systems
· Creating nonviolent, win/win solutions to problems
· Building cooperative relationships that respect the highest in each person
· Learning to truly listen to other points of view
· Examining the psychological roots of problems
· Enhancing self-esteem
· Using intuition and "attunement" in decision making
· Shifting from a mechanistic toward a spiritual, value-oriented perspective.

New paradigms require a profound change in consciousness, involving a shift of our deepest assumptions of what it means to be a human being. Spiritual, transformational politics requires a similar shift in our consciousness.--- former Ojai Mayor Suza Francin (1999)

(Suza is talking pakikipagkapwa and pagbabalikloob to me!!)